Development at the urban fringe and beyond
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Development at the urban fringe and beyond impacts on agriculture and rural land by Ralph E. Heimlich

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in Washington, DC (1800 M St., NW, Washington 20036-5831) .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States,
  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Land use, Rural -- United States -- Planning.,
  • Land use, Rural -- Government policy -- United States.,
  • Farms -- Government policy -- United States.,
  • Urbanization -- United States.,
  • Rural development -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementRalph E. Heimlich, William D. Anderson.
SeriesAgricultural economic report ;, no. 803
ContributionsAnderson, William D. 1938-, United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD1751 .A91854 no. 803, HD256 .A91854 no. 803
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 80 p. :
Number of Pages80
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4016934M
LC Control Number2001387984

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Development at the Urban Fringe and Beyond: Impacts on Agriculture and Rural Land. by Ralph Heimlich and William Anderson. Land development in the United States is following two routes: expansion of urban areas and large-lot development (greater than 1 acre per house) in rural areas. Urban expansion claimed more than 1 million acres per year ?pubid=   beyond the urban fringe. Development imposes direct costs on the communi-ties experiencing it, as well as indirect costs in terms of the rural lands sacrificed to it—A number of stud-ies show that less dense, unplanned development requires higher private and public capital and operating costs than more compact, denser planned ://?v=0. DEVELOPMENT AT THE URBAN FRINGE AND BEYOND: IMPACTS ON Downloadable! Land development in the United States is following two routes: expansion of urban areas and large-lot development (greater than 1 acre per house) in rural areas. Urban expansion claimed more than 1 million acres per year between and , yet is not seen as a threat to most farming, although it may reduce production of some high-value or specialty ://

Development at the urban fringe and beyond: impacts on agriculture and rural land. By et al. Ralph E. Heimlich. Abstract. Land development in the United States is following two routes: expansion of urban areas and large-lot development (greater than 1 acre per house) in rural areas. Urban expansion claimed more than 1 million acres per year Land development in the United States is following two routes: expansion of urban areas and large-lot development (greater than 1 acre per house) in rural areas. Urban expansion claimed more than 1 million acres per year between and , yet is not seen as a threat to most farming, although it may reduce production of some high-value or specialty ://   Development at the Urban Fringe and Beyond: Impacts on Agriculture and R ural Land (Chapter IV) Author: Ralph E. Heimlich and William D. Anderson Subject: Agricultural economics, sprawl Keywords: land development, sprawl, land zoning, population growth, specialty agri culture, high-value agriculture, rural amenities, smart growth, agricult ural pdf/ Farmland Protection. This older but important report from the USDA’s Economic Research Service examines the two major patterns of U.S. land development—expansion of urban areas and large-lot development (greater than 1 acre per house) in rural areas—and the potential impacts on agriculture and rural ://

「Development at the urban fringe and beyond: impacts on agriculture and rural land」を図書館から検索。カーリルは複数の図書館からまとめて蔵書検索ができるサービスです。 Get this from a library! Development at the urban fringe and beyond: impacts on agriculture and rural land. [Ralph E Heimlich; William D Anderson; United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.] -- Land development in the United States is following two routes: expansion of urban areas and large-lot development (greater than 1 acre per house) in rural :// The non-metropolitan hinterland of the United States is no longer the placid and bucolic countryside celebrated by Currier and Ives. As urban America imposes ever-increasing demands upon the nation’s resources, energy, water, food, recreation and scenery, peace and quiet are all sought in the land beyond the urban :// Get this from a library! Development at the urban fringe and beyond: impacts on agriculture and rural land. [Ralph E Heimlich; William D Anderson; United States. Department of Agriculture. Economic Research Service.]